The Food Bank welcomes food donations from individuals and companies alike. If you would like to make a donation of food as an individual, please see Food Drives, or consider making a cash donation. If you represent a company in the food industry and would like to make a corporate donation, please read on for more information.

The Regional Food Bank receives several hundred thousand pounds of donated food and non-food items each week from the food industry. No donation is too great or too small. Every donation plays a part in making it possible for the Food Bank to provide over 35 million pounds of food and grocery products each year for hungry and disadvantaged people. The Food Bank has the capacity to serve as your one-stop resource for making optimal use of unmarketable product, giving you the opportunity to conveniently reach several non-profit agencies with your donations.

Who Donates Food?

The food industry is the backbone of food banking. Hundreds of local and national companies donate quality food to the Regional Food Bank, including:

  • Distributors
  • Farmers
  • Food Brokers
  • Manufacturers
  • Restaurants & Foodservice Operations
  • Retailers
  • Wholesalers

Venison Donation Coalition of New York State

Venison is a wonderful, nutritious natural resource that many of our programs and their clients are very happy to receive. For information on how to donate venison and to find a processor in your county, please go to http://www.venisondonation.com

Food Donor Spotlight

Beekman 1802 Farm and Mercantile was founded by Josh Kilmer-Purcell and Brent Ridge when they purchased Beekman Farm in Sharon Springs, Schoharie County, in 2007. The business began with the two partnering with a local farmer to sell goat’s milk soap and cheese and has expanded to become Beekman 1802 Mercantile.

They now sell food, clothing, home décor, outdoor, and beauty items both online and at their flagship store in Sharon Springs. Beekman 1802 aims to spread the “message of hard work, living seasonally, and neighborly sharing around the globe.” The mission of neighborly sharing can be seen in the company’s donations to the Regional Food Bank and their dedication to upstate New York.

“We are pleased to support the Regional Food Bank with a recent donation of baking mixes and gourmet condiments. Beekman 1802 has long had ties with the Capital Region through our manufacturing partner, Casa Visco,” says co-founder Brent Ridge. “We recently became part of the Start-Up NY program and moved our corporate headquarters to Schenectady. From the our headquarters we publish our quarterly magazine, The Beekman 1802 Almanac, and house all of our executive team.”

The donations we received from Beekman 1802 are greatly appreciated and will enhance meals served at on-site feeding programs and in the homes of food pantry recipients. For more information on Beekman 1802 and their upcoming special events, please see beekman1802.com

Farm Donor Spotlight

What Type of Food is Donated?

The Food Bank accepts donations of shelf-stable, fresh and frozen food, and non-food items such as paper goods, personal hygiene products and cleaning supplies – basically any item available from a grocery retailer or distributor. These products may no longer be marketable for the company, but if they are still good to use and can be safely consumed they are of great value to the non-profits the Food Bank serves.
There are many reasons why companies choose to donate, including:

  • Production flaws
  • Overproduction
  • Mislabeling
  • Unlabeled product (can be accepted with verification of ingredients)
  • Discontinuation of product line
  • Pack changes or reformulations
  • Code dates –guidelines are researched and followed for safely utilizing close or past dated products
  • Cosmetic packaging damages
  • Shipping errors
  • Deliveries that are not accepted and cannot be returned cost-effectively
  • Product samples or test market items
  • Unharvested or imperfect produce

Benefits to Our Food Industry Partners

  • Liability Protection – The Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Act of 1996
    • Protects food donors from liability when donating to a 501©3 non-profit organization
    • Protects donors from civil and criminal liability for all product donated in good faith
    • Standardizes donor liability exposure
    • For more information see The Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Act of 1996
  • Convenience and savings in storage, inventory, transportation and dumping costs
  • Complete product tracking and recall capabilities
  • Product donation receipt showing item(s) and total weight
  • Safe Food Handling Training
  • The most important reason of all… over 40,000 people need food assistance each week in the Food Bank’s service area

Donating is Easy

If you would like more information about making a food donation, call:

Joanne Dwyer
Director of Food Industry Relations & Business Development Representative
518-786-3691, x223

To make arrangements for a food donation, call:

Receiving Office
518-786-3691, x242

To schedule a pick up or delivery after hours, please leave a message and we will return your call the next business day.

If you are located in Dutchess, Ulster, Orange, Sullivan, Putnam or Rockland counties, please call our branch facility:

Food Bank of the Hudson Valley
(845) 534-5344

The Food Bank is available to pick up or receive deliveries Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.

To help us best prepare for your donation, please provide the following product information:

  • Company name, contact(s), address, phone, fax and e-mail
  • Receipting address (if different from product location)
  • Date and time you would like the product picked up (or delivered to the Food Bank)
  • Amount / number of pallets
  • Product information and reason for donation –best-used-by dates, pack size, pallet configuration, information about extended shelf life, etc…